Summary List 9.10/10 1. Editors choice: In Cold Blood 9.99/10 2. Premium pick: The Blood of Emmett Till 8.50/10 3. Best value: The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America 9.25/10 4. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil 9.95/10 5. I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer 9.00/10 6. People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo -- and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up 8.95/10 7. Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI 8.75/10 8. Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town 8.40/10 9. The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York 8.25/10 10. My Dark Places

True crime seems to have taken the world by storm. From documentaries to podcasts to film adaptations, everyone loves to unravel a good mystery. While they get a little less love, true crime books are just as powerful and were actually the precursors of the genre.

While it might seem morbid, true crime books allow us to look at the dark and scary parts of our world from the comfort of our own safe bubbles. Humans are, by nature, curious, and we get a satisfying little thrill by feeling like we're part of those who are attempting to solve an unsolved mystery. As we turn each page and read each chapter, we gain more insight and rush to assemble the puzzle, piece by piece. And if the puzzle has already been pieced together, we simply follow along, hoping to figure out how to prevent something like that from happening to us.

The best true crime books tantalize us with new insight into infamous crimes or with unbelievable stories about relatively-unknown crimes. Some focus on murderers and criminals, while others look at victims or law enforcement. Regardless of the topic or focus, there are dozens of incredible, award-winning true crime books out there. Luckily for you, we've compiled here a list of the best true crime books, all just waiting to be read. As you read the following list of books, take into consideration the brief descriptions of each. Once you're done, you'll be able to find one of the best true crime books!

Editors choice 1. In Cold Blood 9.10 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote is not only a fascinating and well-written story, it's considered to have invented the modern novelistic true crime genre. This 343-page true crime book was published in 1966 by Random House and would go on to become the second-best-selling true crime book in history.

In Cold Blood follows the events leading to and the aftermath of the murder of the Kansas Clutter family at the hands of two ex-convicts surnamed Hickock and Smith. Four members of the Clutter family were brutally murdered in their family farmhouse, including the father, wife, and two younger children, as Hickock and Smith attempted to steal the money they believed to be hidden in the home. Unfortunately, the pair had been misinformed by a former Clutter employee and cellmate at the Kansas State Penitentiary, who had claimed that large amounts of money were kept in various safes around the home. When it was discovered that no money was on the premises, Smith grew angry and began murdering the family one by one.

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote is beautifully-written in Capote's signature style. It's also thoroughly-detailed and it explores multiple perspectives of those involved in the case. Though some parts differ from the true events, which excluded this book from receiving certain awards like the Pulitzer Prize, if you're a true crime fan, this book is a must-read and definitely one of the best true crime books of all time.

Read More Key Features Written by Truman Capote Follows the murder of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas Second-best-selling true crime book in history Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 343 Publication Date: January 17, 1966 Publisher: Random House Pros Eloquently written Explores multiple perspectives Thoroughly detailed Cons Some parts differ from the true events Buy This Product In Cold Blood amazon Shop Premium pick 2. The Blood of Emmett Till 9.99 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

The Blood of Emmett Till by Timothy B. Tyson is a deeply-moving and critically-acclaimed investigation into a pivotal event in the civil rights movement. This 304-page true crime book was published by Simon & Schuster in 2017 and was longlisted for the National Book Award. It was also a New York Times bestseller, the winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, and was featured on several Best Book lists of 2017.

The Blood of Emmett Till follows the events leading up to and the aftermath of the 1955 lynching of fourteen-year-old Emmett Till. The main part of the story looks into Emmett Till's life and the crime he was accused of that lead to his lynching. New evidence is presented, including the admission of Till's innocence by the woman who accused him. Yet, it also examines the 1954 Supreme Court decision that public school segregation was unconstitutional and the moment, weeks after Till's murder, that Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of the bus in Montgomery, Alabama. The book is written as a partial political history, revealing the ripple effect of Till's murder as he became an icon of injustice and the figure at the center of the most notorious hate crime in American history.

The Blood of Emmett Till by Timothy B. Tyson is essentially required reading, not just for true crime fans, but for all Americans to better understand racial injustice. Though it is well-written and hard to put down, this is one of the best true crime books of all time particularly because of the gravity and importance of its content. While there are some scenes that are difficult to read, this book is ultimately insightful, educational, and deeply important.

Read More Key Features Written by Timothy B. Tyson Longlisted for the National Book Award Examines the lynching of Emmett Till Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 304 Publication Date: December 5, 2017 Publisher: Simon & Schuster Pros A New York Times bestseller Insightful and educational Captivatingly well-written Cons Some scenes are difficult to read Buy This Product The Blood of Emmett Till amazon Shop Best value 3. The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America 8.50 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America by Erik Larson is on nearly every "Best True Crime Books" list as it's a unique and fascinating story by a critically-acclaimed author. This 447-page true crime book was published in 2004 by Crown and was a finalist for the National Book Award. It was also a New York Times bestseller and won many other awards and honors.

The Devil in the White City follows the events of the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago. The stories of the Fair's architect Daniel Burnham and serial killer H.H. Holmes are interwoven throughout the book. We learn that Holmes lured his victims, many of whom were Fair attendees, to their deaths in his elaborate and gruesomely-constructed murder castle. At the same time, we follow Burnham's struggles to build and plot the Fair.

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America by Erik Larson is at once meticulously researched and incredibly detailed, yet is also easy to read and feels like a novel. While some complained it was a tad overlong and that the book focused a bit more on the World's Fair than it did on H.H. Holmes, this book is still phenomenal. Combining hard facts with excellent storytelling is not easy to do, which is why this is certainly one of the best true crime books of all time.

Read More Key Features Written by Erik Larson Finalist for the National Book Award Follows a serial killer during the 1893 World's Fair Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 447 Publication Date: February 10, 2004 Publisher: Crown Publishers Pros A New York Times bestseller Meticulously researched Reads like a novel Cons A bit overlong Buy This Product The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America amazon Shop 4. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil 9.25 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt is a story that almost seems like fiction. With a cast of wacky characters and a hauntingly-beautiful backdrop, this 400-page true crime book is hard to put down. Published in 1999 by Vintage, this book was a finalist for the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction. It also won the 1995 Boeke Prize and was on the New York Times bestseller list for 216 weeks.

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil takes place in Savannah, Georgia, and follows the shooting of local male prostitute Danny Hansford. Hansford was employed by Jim Williams, who was a respected antiques dealer and socialite, and who was also accused of shooting Hansford, though he claimed it was in self-defense. While the various trials are considered as the main part of the story, including the fourth and final trial which had to be moved away from the Savannah jury pool, the book also explores several other colorful characters and residents of Savannah, including a local transgender woman named The Lady Chablis.

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt is such an incredible true story that it grips you tightly and holds your attention for hours on end. Though the plot often feels less important than the characters themselves, it's still a fascinating read. Whether you enjoy detailed character studies or reading the fascinating history of a city like Savannah, Georgia, this is simply one of the best true crime books of all time.

Read More Key Features Written by John Berendt Finalist for the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction Examines the murder trial of a socialite in Savannah, Georgia Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 400 Publication Date: June 28, 1999 Publisher: Vintage Pros Interesting group of eccentric characters Explores the fascinating history of the city Reads like fiction Cons Plot takes a backseat to character exploration Buy This Product Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil amazon Shop 5. I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer 9.95 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer by Michelle McNamara is an incredible true story of McNamara's journey and investigation into the crimes of the "East Area Rapist" as he was once known. Yet, what partially makes this story so incredible and so sad is that McNamara died unexpectedly of an accidental overdose two years before the book was published. The book was also published two months before the arrest of Joseph James DeAngelo who confessed to the crimes of the Golden State Killer. This 368-page true crime book was published in 2019 by HarperCollins and became a #1 New York Times bestseller in addition to winning several other awards and honors.

I'll Be Gone in the Dark follows McNamara's investigation into the man she dubs the "Golden State Killer", who she believes is behind a series of seemingly-disconnected attacks including rapes, murders, and burglaries. The man had previously been known as the Original Night Stalker, the East Bay Rapist, the East Area Rapist, the Visalia Ransacker, and the Diamond Knot Killer, amongst other names. As McNamara passed away while her book was only two-thirds completed, a group composed of McNamara's husband, actor and comedian Patton Oswalt, investigative journalist Billy Jensen, and crime writer Paul Haynes, came together to finish it. The book features an introduction by acclaimed crime author Gillian Flynn and an afterword by Oswalt.

I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer by Michelle McNamara is difficult to put down due to its compelling storytelling and empathetic look at the victims. If you are a true crime fan or simply enjoy an incredible true story, you should read this as it's definitely one of the best true crime books of all time.

Read More Key Features Written by Michelle McNamara A #1 New York Times bestseller Follows the investigation of a California serial rapist and killer Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 368 Publication Date: February 26, 2019 Publisher: HarperCollins Pros Won multiple awards Hard to put down Empathetic look at the victims Cons Author passed away before the killer was discovered Buy This Product I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer amazon Shop 6. People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo -- and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up 9.00 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo -- and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up by Richard Lloyd Parry is a terrifying true story of a young white woman who was murdered in Tokyo, Japan. This 454-page true crime book was published in 2012 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux, and was named a Top 10 Best Book of 2012 by Publishers Weekly.

People Who Eat Darkness follows the disappearance of 21-year-old Englishwoman Lucie Blackman. Blackman arrived in Tokyo, Japan in 2000 and began working as a hostess at a club in the Roppongi district. As part of her job, she would occasionally meet up with clients outside of the club, and on one such outing, she disappeared. What followed was a search for Lucie by her father Tim and sister Sophie, who traveled to Tokyo and received support from British Prime Minister Tony Blair, who, in turn, pressured the Japanese Prime Minister to make the case a higher priority. Despite several twists and turns, the authorities were led to Joji Obara, a man who had documented a long history of knocking out and raping women.

People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo -- and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up by Richard Lloyd Parry is genuinely frightening. While some scenes are certainly difficult to read, it's honestly so compelling that it's hard to put this book down. With a deep and thoughtful exploration of the real people involved in this crime, this is truly one of the best true crime books ever written.

Read More Key Features Written by Richard Lloyd Parry Top 10 Best Book of 2012 by Publishers Weekly Follows the murder of a white woman in Tokyo, Japan Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 454 Publication Date: January 1, 2012 Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Giroux Pros Frightening plot Deep exploration of the characters Compelling and hard to put down Cons Some scenes are difficult to read Buy This Product People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo -- and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up amazon Shop 7. Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI 8.95 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann is a shocking and eye-opening book that not only follows a series of murders that plagued the Osage Nation, but it also follows the birth and early days of the FBI. This 400-page true crime book was published in 2018 by Vintage and was also a finalist for the National Book Award. It was also a New York Times bestseller and was featured on multiple "Best Book of the Year" lists.

Killers of the Flower Moon follows the murder of several Osage Nation people in Osage County, Oklahoma. In the early 1920s, it was revealed that large oil deposits were found on Osage land and they were awarded the rights to the oil profits in court. Unfortunately, a long and complicated process stood in the way of the distribution of the profits, which meant that many of the Osage people never saw any money related to the sale of the oil. At the same time, a group of people in the area who are hostile towards the Osage people begin to murder them one by one in the hopes of gaining control of the oil rights.

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann is fantastic for numerous reasons. Not only is it a multi-layered mystery that shows various perspectives of those involved, but it also features several shocking twists. While there are certainly some disturbing scenes, the book is written in a respectful way to shed light on a crime not known to many. For all these reasons and more, this is truly one of the best true crime books ever written.

Read More Key Features Written by David Grann Finalist for the National Book Award Explores the Osage Nation murders Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 400 Publication Date: April 3, 2018 Publisher: Vintage Pros A New York Times bestseller Multi-layered mystery Shocking twists Cons Some disturbing scenes Buy This Product Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI amazon Shop 8. Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town 8.75 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer is a heartbreaking and eye-opening account of several rapes that occurred around the University of Montana. This 416-page true crime book was published in 2016 by Anchor and quickly received critical acclaim.

Between 2008 and 2012, 350 sexual assaults were investigated by the Department of Justice in Missoula, yet very few were properly handled by local authorities or the University.

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town follows several women who were raped in Missoula, Montana, a college town home to the University of Montana. The book chronicles the details of the nights they were raped, their emotions in the aftermath, their cruel or indifferent treatment by law enforcement and by those within the court system, the way they were seen by the public, and the impact it had on their lives. Krakauer makes clear that Missoula is not the exception, but the rule, as so many other towns, big and small, treat rape and sexual assault victims with the same vicious scrutiny they should use against the assaulters and rapists.

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer is meticulously researched and straightforward in its goal to shed light on an underreported issue plaguing hundreds of cities and college towns just like Missoula, Montana. Yet, at the same time, the book supports and gives voices to those who were assaulted and raped in an empathetic and respectful way. Though this book contains scenes that are disturbing, it is one of the best true crime books ever written.

Read More Key Features Written by Jon Krakauer Follows several rape cases Set in Missoula, Montana Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 416 Publication Date: January 12, 2016 Publisher: Anchor Pros Meticulously researched Sheds light on an underreported story Critically-acclaimed Cons Some disturbing scenes Buy This Product Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town amazon Shop 9. The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York 8.40 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York by Deborah Blum is a fascinating book that explores the birth of forensic toxicology and the forensic scientists who investigated crimes based on various poisonous substances. This 336-page true crime book was published in 2011 by Penguin and became a New York Times bestseller.

The Poisoner's Handbook is set in New York City during the early 1900s, just as Charles Norris is appointed as the first medical examiner of the city. We also meet Alexander Gettler, the city's first toxicologist. Together, the pair work to solve various cases of poisoning, some accidental and some insidious, from 1915 to 1936. Since poisoners could get away with murder before this time, the two scientists set a standard of forensic science for the rest of the country and help to solve dozens of mysteries and deaths. The book almost plays out like the series CSI, with the pair investigating a different death in each story.

The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York by Deborah Blum features strong storytelling and a unique format as various anecdotes are shared in an almost episodic format. Yet, beware, as there are some scenes not for the squeamish or faint of heart. Whether you're more interested in science or mystery, this book is definitely for you. It's simply one of the best true crime books ever written!

Read More Key Features Written by Deborah Blum Details the birth of forensic toxicology Compiled as a series of short stories Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 336 Publication Date: January 25, 2011 Publisher: Penguin Books Pros Strong storytelling A New York Times bestseller Equal parts science and mystery Cons Some disturbing scenes Buy This Product The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York amazon Shop 10. My Dark Places 8.25 / 10 Read Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews Read More Reviews

My Dark Places by James Ellroy is an incredibly personal account of one son's mission to discover the truth behind his mother's murder. This 355-page true crime book was published in 1997 by Knopf and was a New York Times Notable Book for 1996.

My Dark Places follows the murder of Geneva Ellroy, the author's mother. Geneva, known as Jean, was found strangled by the side of the road in El Monte, California by a group of children and their baseball coaches on June 22, 1958. While the L.A. Homicide Bureau chased several leads based on evidence gathered from the scene and anonymous tips that had been sent in, no one was arrested or convicted in relation to the crime. Eventually, the case was abandoned. Jean's son, James, quickly became obsessed with another murder that mirrored his mother's: the murder of Elizabeth Short, the Black Dahlia. Though he ran from his mother's murder for years and instead chose to focus on the murder of Short, James eventually decides to team up with Bill Stoner, a retired L.A. investigator, and search for his mother's killer.

My Dark Places by James Ellroy is an exemplar of memoir as the author looks deep inside himself as he confronts his mother's murder. The straightforward sentence style brings forth feelings of a true crime investigation while the extremely personal details the author presents make it feel more like an autobiography. In the end, the result is brilliant, which is why this is one of the best true crime books of all time.

Read More Key Features Written by James Ellroy Investigates the murder of the author's mother A New York Times Notable Book for 1996 Specifications Genre: True Crime Number of Pages: 355 Publication Date: August 19, 1997 Publisher: Knopf Pros An exemplar of memoir Straightforward writing style Part memoir, part true crime investigation Cons A bit overlong Buy This Product My Dark Places amazon Shop

While it seems like the genre of true crime has been around forever, the genre as we know it is actually relatively new. Let's take a look at a brief history of the genre of true crime and the various sub-genres that have spawned from it.

History Of True Crime Books

One of the earliest examples of the true crime genre was a collection of allegedly-true stories of fraud titled The Book of Swindles by Zhang Yingyu written in 1617. Several other stories of court cases followed and became popular in China during the late Ming dynasty.

On the other side of the world, as literacy rates increased in England during the 1600s, pamphlets and other forms of street literature were published and distributed which featured stories of murders and other crimes. This continued through the 19th century in England and in the United States, with a Scottish lawyer named William Roughead publishing essays about notable British murder trials, earning him the title of the "Dean of the Modern True Crime Genre".

Yet, it wasn't until the 1960s with Truman Capote's In Cold Blood that the novelistic true crime genre was made popular. This led to the style of true crime stories that we're familiar with today, which focus on the details of the crimes and look at the various perspectives of those involved.

Genres Of True Crime Books

The genre of true crime is powerful. There have been several murders and disappearances that have been solved and several perpetrators who have been brought to justice as a result of true crime books and the widespread exposure of cases that had been deemed unsolved. On the flip side, some suggest that true crime is insensitive to the victims and their families with the ways that it sensationalizes the crimes.

There are several sub-genres of true crime that are popular, with stories of murder being the most popular. Most of these books follow serial killers, though some books follow a single murder.

Other true crime sub-genres follow disappearances. These are popular as readers enjoy investigating the various theories of what occurred and whether the victim of the disappearance is still alive. Some true crime sub-genres look into organized crime such as gangs, cartels, and other groups. Similarly, other true crime books follow cults and religious groups that have committed crimes. Lastly, there are the true crime books that follow other crimes such as rape and sexual assault, fraud, kidnapping, and drug offenses.

All in all, there are dozens of sub-genres of true crime and several examples of true crime books that have been published over the years. Whether you like a good mystery, consider yourself an amateur sleuth or are simply looking to arm yourself with information to prevent a crime from happening to you, you should read a true crime book! Now that you've finished this guide, you can revisit our list of the best true crime books and find the perfect one for you!

FAQ Q: Are true crime books based on real stories?

The short answer is: yes. True crime books, movies, and podcasts are based on real events. In these books, movies, and podcasts, the narrator guides readers through a crime that occurred at some point during history. The details of these stories are based on real people that existed or exist today. Within the true crime genre, there are subsections. The most popular subsection of true crime revolves around serial killers and murder, but it's also possible to find true crime media that fits into terrorism, robbery, and other criminal disciplines. The key component of these stories is that they're based on true events.

Q: Is Scream a true crime movie?

While "Scream" is said to be based on a real character, the film series is more commonly cataloged as a horror, slasher, or mystery film. The character that's depicted as the perpetrator in the Scream movies is based on Danny Rolling, who believed that he was possessed. Over the course of his multi-year killing spree, he murdered eight people. He is said to have referred to the demon that possessed him as "Gemini." And Gemini was responsible for the crimes. Although the inspiration for the Scream films may have come from Rolling, many of the details of the Scream films are imagined and they convey events with no parallels to Rolling's story.

Q: Did Ted Bundy have a child?

Ted Bundy had a child with Carole Ann Boone, who he married while he was on trial. Rose Bundy was born in October of 1982. She is believed to be Ted Bundy's only child. Rose Bundy is likely still alive today. She has been reported to live in Britain, where she has children of her own. Three years before Ted Bundy was scheduled for death row, Carole divorced him. She left Florida. And she never spoke to Ted again. As for Carole, some sources suspect that she changed her name to Abigail Griffin in order to keep her out of the public eye.

Q: How does True Crime impact mental health?

True crime is one of the most exciting and popular genres today. It allows readers and movie watchers to explore the dark side of the human mind from the safety of their homes. But some experts say that we should exercise caution while ingesting true crime media. While small exposures to true crime may broaden our awareness and educate us on the underbelly of society, it's possible that true crime can create and boost paranoia. Those who have been victims may find true crime to be particularly triggering. And they should take precautions when deciding whether or not to jump into the true crime genre.

Q: Are serial killers born or created?

While no one has yet been able to definitively answer this question, most scientists agree that many serial killers exhibit both biological and environmental discrepancies that set them apart from other humans. Factors like trauma can also impact a person's relationship to life and murder. But since not all abused people become serial killers, there are likely a number of additional factors that go into creating a serial killer. Over 90 percent of recorded serial killers are men. And they tend to exhibit a higher level of intelligence. It isn't uncommon for a serial killer to perform poorly in school, and to face abuse or dysfunction at home.

Q: Are murderer's brains different?

In short, yes, murderer's brains appear to be different. Compared to other types of criminals, murderer's brains exhibit unique characteristics. In a murderer, it's most common to see discrepancies in the areas of the brain that are responsible for empathy, social processing, and behavioral control. One neuroscientist found that murderers tend to have less grey matter than non-murderers. And larger amounts of grey matter may help you to better process information, which means that those who are able to commit murder may be lacking in the ability to fully process their environment.

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Margeaux Perkins is a writer for Screen Rant specializing in buyer's guides and product reviews. Prior to joining the Screen Rant team, Margeaux graduated from the University of Chicago with degrees in English and Theater and a minor in German. Her writing journey started there, crafting restaurant reviews for Spoon University and reporting on student street style for College Fashionista. She's since worked as a bestselling ghostwriter for Scholastic, covering video game strategy guides and novelizations for critically-acclaimed franchises. As a staff writer for the Parcast Network, she produced scripts for historical, true crime, and supernatural podcast episodes. Her writing has also been published on Buzzfeed and in Encyclopaedia Britannica. When she's not writing for Screen Rant, Margeaux contributes reviews and guides to CBR and ghostwrites biographies as a Senior Staff Writer with Story Terrace. She's also working on her second mystery novel, set in the Great Smoky Mountains of East Tennessee. She's passionate about East Asia (where she lived for 5 years), baked goods, and TV.

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